Sayings of The mad Yogi – 5

I spent my entire life being sensible until I found Wisdom.


Buddhaland Brooklyn

Buddhaland Brooklyn (2)

The Dharma Forum has been asked to review Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard Morais. We welcome this opportunity and have created a page in our menu for our past reviews. Enjoy reading! And we hope to make this a feature of the future where we can preview Buddhist related books and films. There are two reviews here, the first by AndyDharma and the second by DharmaForum.

By AndyDharma

Buddhaland Brooklyn, the new novel by Richard C. Morais is a cracking good read, enjoyable from first to last. But, being a novel about Buddhists from East and West trying to get their act together to create a Buddhism that works in the modern world, it presses all the right hot-button issues without ever, to my mind, satisfactorily resolving them, although they are so resolved for the main character of the novel, Seido Oda. But then, having been a Buddhist for over 20 years myself and having seen close-up many of the shenanigans Western Buddhists can get up to in the internal – sometimes infernal – politics of trying to get a Buddhist tradition established in the West, I am deeply sceptical of happy endings such as the charming one this novel has. Mind you, I wouldn’t mind being in a group such as the fictional Headwater Sect that Seido Oda belongs to, a mish-mash of Japanese Zen, Nichiren and Pure Land traditions. Theirs is a simple, cut-down form of Buddhism that relies upon deep faith – especially faith in the Lotus Sutra –  and an application of that faith in a willing engagement with others in the apparently mundane affairs of everyday life. Seido Oda, the narrator of the novel, is a priest in the Headwater Sect, and grows up in the Japanese temple his parents put him in as a child before being posted by the Sect to New York to help build and open a new temple built there by the American ‘Believers’. He takes the affairs of everyday life quite literally indeed, having a passionate affair with the young American lady who is his closest assistant in the New York temple project. But the Headwater Sect, like Japanese priests in general, appear to have a laid-back attitude to sex, not seeing strict celibacy as necessary in the priesthood, so no scandal or serious complications follow from this affair. In reality, in the West, scandalous, damaging sexual affairs between Buddhist monks and their disciples is fairly common, especially in the more puritanical of the Tibetan Buddhist traditions, partly the result of unrealistic expectations on the part of Western Buddhists about ordination and partly due to the misunderstanding of the cultural norms and psychological dynamics of Western disciples on the part of Eastern priests/lamas/monks. Indeed, in the novel, Seido Oda’s affair helps him to grow up and to loosen up, and leads to him being able to better connect with, and understand, himself and his denial of his own past traumas and emotional needs, as well as helping him better understand his students and the cultural context of his surroundings in Brooklyn. But the novel is not really about sex. It is about the inevitable cultural clash that occurs when Eastern Buddhism comes to the West and the many difficulties of adjustment that follow. What emerges is, as always, something which is neither wholly East nor West, but an unexpected amalgam of the two. Whether you end up with a ‘pure’ Buddhism, however you want to define it, is another question entirely. Seido Oda thinks he has, but I’m not so sure. But then I’m just an incorrigible sceptic.

More to the point, Seido Oda has a passion for Japanese haiku and any novel that skilfully blends the immortal haiku of Basho and Issa into the narrative gets my vote anytime. Perhaps the perfection of haiku as a vehicle for truly great poetry is the greatest contribution of Japanese Buddhism to Buddhism in general, if not to world art. Anyway, Morais’ own writing style gets pleasantly poetic at times, especially in his descriptions of the natural environment of Japan that Oda grows up in and which helps to deepen his spirituality:

“The Buddha’s Elbow Waterfall stood in the forest, a white-water thrashing of stones that forced involuntary sighs, gulps and gurgles from the river. Sake-coloured froth turned at the water’s surface and sent a drunken spray into the air, moistening nearby mats of green moss. The river eventually settled and the exposed rocks in the lower pool jutted up, round and pert, like stone breasts” (p.30).

Indeed, Morais’ description of the surrounding, whether it be in Japan or Brooklyn, seem to be stronger and more effective than his characterisations of people, some of whom hover perilously near to comic stereotyping. But his understanding of psychological dynamics helps to make the plot of the novel believable overall and those dynamics play out neatly towards the charming ending, where a contented Oda sits in Brooklyn watching the world go by and sees that enlightenment is “the ability to suffer what there is to suffer; it is the ability to enjoy what there is to enjoy” (p.276). Is it that simple? I don’t know, but I hope so. At least I had the ability to enjoy this enjoyable novel; that will do for me.

By DharmaForum

Buddhaland Brooklyn is fiction and that’s a shame. We enjoy the characters and the land so much that we want them to be true. The Headwater Sect is based on the Nichiren Shoshu, or another similar group of Buddhists from Japan. This is because their sole practice is reciting the Lotus Sutra. Interestingly, this leads their monk, Seido, and all the others characters in the monastery to feel free to engage in whatever activity that appeals to them, whilst remaining monks. Not surprisingly they hide some of their excesses, such as drinking sake, from the local community, but the Lotus Sutra has freed them into a consideration that the Buddha Nature is free, and so are all activities. He quotes (p.152):

“No affairs of life or work are in any way different from the ultimate reality.”    Lotus Sutra

This is a very advanced view and requires the student to see emptiness before engaging in this way of life; before freeing themselves from the karmic restraints of controlled behaviour. As Padmasambhava said, until you have realised emptiness directly you must maintain all your vows and behaviour utterly.”

The book is good and apart from the above slight criticisms, which are more wishful thinking than telling off, I thoroughly recommend this book for bedtime reading.

Here is an extract to judge the timeless quality of life in rural Japan conjured so effortlessly.

“I am reminded of the ancient poem by Iio Sõgi.”

“I cannot recall it.”

However low one may be, 

 It is in holding oneself in sway

 That is imperative.”

Senior Acolyte Fukuyama sighed in appreciation. “But still,” he finally said, “I prefer a bit of humour. Kobayashi Issa:

Tub to Tub

The whole journey –  

Just hub-bub.”

Reverend Kawaguchi smiled. “Yes. This poem is very fine.”

In that moment – sitting under the cypress, the breeze sweeping yellow pollen across the river’s pooled surface, the air laced with the priests’ poetic murmurs – a belief within me took hold with such force that I involuntarily shivered. I was just a boy, true, but in the hellish aftermath of my family’s destruction I was visited by a conviction that a clearing filled with Tranquil Light was waiting for me somewhere, and that one day I would find my way to this clearing, this safe haven patiently awaiting my arrival. (p.31-32)

Seido’s struggles in Brooklyn are more difficult. He has been sent to New York to open their New Temple, a kindness to his teacher that he cannot refuse. Seido craves only the peace of Japan, but temple politics will not permit it and his karma must be fulfilled.

The children’s voices in Sant’ Andrea Park beckoned like birds in the forest around the Temple of Everlasting Prayer. An old man and woman rested on a park bench with their parcels, wheezing jokes as they watched the shoppers passing back and forth the intimate, earthy poetry of Brooklyn.

The tired woman finally dropped her white head on the shoulder of her husband’s peacoat. “Come on”, he said, squeezing her thigh. “Let’s get this stuff home. You’re tired.” It was good advice, and I decided to return home, too, in order to give thanks to the Buddha. But as I moved to leave the park, as I breathed in the air, the reality of where I stood finally hit me.

Brooklyn.

It was the Buddhaland. (p.262)

Buddhaland Brooklyn is published by Alma Publishing and is available from them at £12.99. Also available from Wisdom, Amazon and all good book stores.


and now for something completely different…

One of the joys of helping out at Maitreya Centre was the occasional outbreak of serendipity.  It was extraordinarily serendipitous that on the very first day that the centre opened, a certain Bill Wyatt wombled in to offer his good wishes and his services. Bill Wyatt is such a modest, unassuming and humble person that it was not until much later, and circuitously, that I learnt that he is one of the finest and most respected haiku poets in the world today. And he is a Buddhist too, from the Soto Zen school, being the first Zen Buddhist monk to be ordained in the UK, way back when. That first day he was so welcoming, so full of delight that a new Buddhist centre had opened up just round the corner from where he lived, and he pitched in with a paintbrush to help us with the decorating that we had already launched into. Over the years that followed, my meetings with him, albeit brief encounters that they were, were always a source of joy, as I bathed in his warmth and wit. I shall never forget that memorable evening when he and I joined forces with other local poets to put on a poetry evening within the centre that was very warmly appreciated by all who attended. That was when the full power and beauty of Bill’s haiku hit home for me, and I can do no more than recommend that you read his haiku to find out for yourself  just what I mean. Haiku can, I think, be seen as a perfect medium for condensing the essence of dharma into as few words as possible, and the best haiku are objects for meditation in themselves. On re-reading Bill’s haiku many times, I now realise that Bill has a very deep and profound understanding of dharma. Yet Bill never once preached any dharma at me in any of his conversations with me. If  you want to know a little bit more about Bill Wyatt and his haiku, I recommend this interview with him: http://haibuntoday.blogspot.co.uk/2008/05/washing-jade-in-muddy-water-bill-wyatt_27.html. Bill recently sent me a small volume of his latest collection of haiku –  a great kindness in itself – so I will give  a little selection of his haiku from that collection:

 

A layman who lives

like a monk – that’s me goofing off

down dusty spring lanes

 

Dodging the raindrops

I swallow a rainbow –

first autumn shower

 

A cloud in trousers

that’s me – gathering seashells

on rainbow wheels

 


Sayings of the Mad Yogi – 4

For the next teaching in a fortnight, I have chosen the subject Non-existent.

For those who want to, I have created a web-page they can visit.

If they go there, they will find I haven’t written anything.


Stories of The Mad Yogi – 4

A lottery ticket blew into my flowerpot. Not a crisp packet, or a newspaper. Two lines of numbers for Wednesday’s draw.

“Do not be fooled by the universe!” I told my students. “It will only let you down! A sign from the Universe that I should use the wealth wisely? No, a sign of sunyata, the worthless, the clothing of samsara. Ignore it and the universe will be yours.”

Confident was I in my practise of Sunyata.

Anyway, there was was only one right number in both lines.


Stories of the Mad Yogi – 3

The mad Yogi was looking at his wife.

“What are you staring at?”

“You. I was looking at your parts.”

“What’s wrong with my parts?” she frowned.

“Nothing. They are all beautiful.”

Relaxing, his wife smiled.

“It’s the whole I have problems with,” he muttered.


Sayings of the mad Yogi – 3

Buddhists are Mad! If I were a Buddhist I’d be crazy!

Why?

I like to be different